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Poems About Kindness

Table of Contents

Poems About Kindness

  1. Kindness by Peter Burn
  2. Kind Hearts by Anonymous
  3. Be Kind to Each Other by Charles Swain
  4. Unkindness by Charles Swain
  5. True Happiness by Richard Lynott O'Malley
  6. Give Them the Flowers Now by Leigh M. Hodges
  7. Deeds of Kindness by Epes Sargent
  8. Let Us Be Kind by W. Lomax Childress
  9. Sowing and Reaping by Adelaide Anne Procter
  10. A Sermon in Rhyme by Anonymous
  11. Perseverance by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  12. Song of Life by Charles Mackay
  13. Help In Need by James McIntyre
  14. The Heartening by Winifred Webb
  15. Small Beginnings by Charles Mackay
  16. Our Duty by Richard Lynott O'Malley
  17. "I'll Stretch It a Little" by Anonymous
  18. Be Kind by Margaret Courtney

1

Kindness

Kind words are ever more mighty than swords.

– Peter Burn
Kindness
by Peter Burn

Show kindness to others!
Treat all men as brothers,
Whatever their station, whatever betide;
All envy disdaining,
A failing discerning,
Seek not to uncover, but rather to hide.

Speak kindly to other,
And wealth shall be yours,
The magic of story still lives in kind words;
Let them be spoken,
And hearts will fly open—
Kind words are ever more mighty than swords.

2

Kind Hearts

Kind hearts are the gardens,
Kind thoughts are the roots,
Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits;

– Anonymous
Kind Hearts
by Anonymous

Kind hearts are the gardens,
Kind thoughts are the roots,
Kind words are the blossoms,
Kind deeds are the fruits;
Love is the sweet sunshine
That warms into life,
For only in darkness
Grow hatred and strife.

3

Be Kind to Each Other

Be kind to each other—
The night's coming on,
When friend and when brother
Perchance may be gone—

– Charles Swain
Be Kind to Each Other
by Charles Swain

Be kind to each other—
The night's coming on,
When friend and when brother
Perchance may be gone—
Then 'midst our dejection
How sweet to have earned
The blest recollection
Of kindness—returned!
When day has departed,
And Memory keeps
Her watch, broken hearted,
Where all she loved sleeps!—

Let falsehood assail not,
Nor envy disprove,—
Let trifles prevail not
Against those you love—
Nor change with to-morrow
Should fortune take wing;
But the deeper the sorrow
The closer still cling—
Oh, be kind to each other!—
The night's coming on,
When friend and when brother
Perchance may be gone!

4

Unkindness

Oh! there's no winter for the heart
Like that unkindness sends!

– Charles Swain
Unkindness
by Charles Swain

Oh! could I learn indifference
From all I hear and see;
Nor think, nor care, for others, more
Than they may care for me!
Why follow thus, with vain regret,
To serve a broken claim;
If others can so soon forget,
Why should not I the same?
Oh! could I learn indifference
From all I hear and see;
Nor think, nor care, for others, more
Than they may care for me!

There is no blight that winter throws,
No frost, however stern,
Like that which chilled affection knows—
Which hearts, forsaken, learn!
What solace can the world impart
When love's reliance ends?
Oh! there's no winter for the heart
Like that unkindness sends!
Oh! could I learn indifference
From all I hear and see;
Nor think, nor care, for others, more
Than they may care for me

5

True Happiness

by Richard Lynott O'Malley

Be happy, be happy, I bid the sad mind,
But learn what true happiness is:
When a dutiful man has a heart good and kind,
True happiness surely is his.

6

Give Them the Flowers Now

Just a kind word or a greeting;
Just a warm grasp or a smile—
These are the flowers that will lighten
The burdens for many a mile.

– Leigh M. Hodges
Give Them the Flowers Now
by Leigh M. Hodges

Closed eyes can't see the white roses,
Cold hands can't hold them, you know;
Breath that is stilled cannot gather
The odors that sweet from them blow.
Death, with a peace beyond dreaming,
Its children of earth doth endow;
Life is the time we can help them,
So give them the flowers now!

Here are the struggles and striving,
Here are the cares and the tears;
Now is the time to be smoothing
The frowns and the furrows and fears.
What to closed eyes are kind sayings?
What to hushed heart is deep vow?
Naught can avail after parting,
So give them the flowers now!

Just a kind word or a greeting;
Just a warm grasp or a smile—
These are the flowers that will lighten
The burdens for many a mile.
After the journey is over
What is the use of them; how
Can they carry them who must be carried?
Oh, give them the flowers now!

Blooms from the happy heart's garden,
Plucked in the spirit of love;
Blooms that are earthly reflections
Of flowers that blossom above.
Words cannot tell what a measure
Of blessing such gifts will allow
To dwell in the lives of many,
So give them the flowers now!

7

Deeds of Kindness

by Epes Sargent

Suppose the little Cowslip
Should hang its golden cup
And say, "I'm such a little flower
I'd better not grow up!"
How many a weary traveller
Would miss its fragrant smell,
How many a little child would grieve
To lose it from the dell!

Suppose the glistening Dewdrop
Upon the grass should say,
"What can a little dewdrop do?
I'd better roll away!"
The blade on which it rested,
Before the day was done,
Without a drop to moisten it,
Would wither in the sun.

Suppose the little Breezes,
Upon a summer's day,
Should think themselves too small to cool
The traveller on his way:
Who would not miss the smallest
And softest ones that blow,
And think they made a great mistake
If they were acting so?

How many deed of kindness
A little child can do,
Although it has but little strength
And little wisdom too!
It wants a loving spirit
Much more than strength, to prove
How many things a child may do
For others by its love.

8

Let Us Be Kind

Let us be kind;
This is a wealth that has no measure,
This is of Heaven and earth the highest treasure—
Let us be kind.

– W. Lomax Childress
Let Us Be Kind
by W. Lomax Childress

Let us be kind;
The way is long and lonely,
And human hearts are asking for this blessing only—
That we be kind.
We cannot know the grief that men may borrow,
We cannot see the souls storm-swept by sorrow,
But love can shine upon the way to-day, to-morrow—
Let us be kind.

Let us be kind;
This is a wealth that has no measure,
This is of Heaven and earth the highest treasure—
Let us be kind.
A tender word, a smile of love in meeting,
A song of hope and victory to those retreating,
A glimpse of God and brotherhood while life is fleeting—
Let us be kind.

Let us be kind;
Around the world the tears of time are falling,
And for the loved and lost these human hearts are calling—
Let us be kind.
To age and youth let gracious words be spoken;
Upon the wheel of pain so many lives are broken,
We live in vain who give no tender token—
Let us be kind.

Let us be kind;
The sunset tints will soon be in the west,
Too late the flowers are laid then on the quiet breast—
Let us be kind.
And when the angel guides have sought and found us,
Their hands shall link the broken ties of earth that bound us,
And Heaven and home shall brighten all around us—
Let us be kind.

9

Sowing and Reaping

by Adelaide Anne Procter

Sow with a generous hand;
Pause not for toil and pain;
Weary not through the heat of summer,
Weary not through the cold spring rain;
But wait till the autumn comes
For the sheaves of golden grain.

Scatter the seed, and fear not,
A table will be spread;
What matter if you are too weary
To eat your hard-earned bread;
Sow, while the earth is broken,
For the hungry must be fed.

Sow;—while the seeds are lying
In the warm earth's bosom deep,
And your warm tears fall upon it—
They will stir in their quiet sleep,
And the green blades rise the quicker,
Perchance, for the tears you weep.

Then sow;—for the hours are fleeting,
And the seed must fall to-day;
And care not what hand shall reap it,
Or if you shall have passed away
Before the waving cornfields
Shall gladden the sunny day.

Sow;—and look onward, upward,
Where the starry light appears,—
Where, in spite of the coward's doubting,
Or your own heart's trembling fears,
You shall reap in joy the harvest
You have sown to-day in tears.

Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously.

– 2 Corinthians 9:6
The Bible, NIV
10

A Sermon in Rhyme

Scatter thus your seed of kindness,
All enriching as you go—
Leave them, trust the Harvest-Giver;
He will make each seed to grow.
So, until its happy end,
Your life shall never lack a friend.

– Anonymous
A Sermon in Rhyme
by Anonymous

If you have a friend worth loving,
Love him. Yes, and let him know
That you love him ere life's evening
Tinge his brow with sunset glow;
Why should good words ne'er be said
Of a friend—till he is dead?

If you hear a song that thrills you,
Sung by any child of song,
Praise it. Do not let the singer
Wait deserved praises long;
Why should one that thrills your heart
Lack that joy it may impart?

If you hear a prayer that moves you
By its humble pleading tone,
Join it. Do not let the seeker
Bow before his God alone;
Why should not your brother share
The strength of "two or three" in prayer?

If you see the hot tears falling
From a loving brother's eyes,
Share them, and by sharing,
Own your kinship with the skies;
Why should anyone be glad,
When his brother's heart is sad?

If a silver laugh goes rippling
Through the sunshine on his face,
Share it. 'Tis the wise man's saying,
For both grief and joy a place;
There's health and goodness in the mirth
In which an honest laugh has birth.

If your work is made more easy
By a friendly helping hand,
Say so. Speak out brave and truly,
Ere the darkness veil the land.
Should a brother workman dear
Falter for a word of cheer?

Scatter thus your seed of kindness,
All enriching as you go—
Leave them, trust the Harvest-Giver;
He will make each seed to grow.
So, until its happy end,
Your life shall never lack a friend.

11

Perseverance

by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

We must not hope to be mowers,
And to gather the ripe gold ears,
Unless we have first been sowers
And watered the furrows with tears.

It is not just as we take it,
This mystical world of ours,
Life's field will yield as we make it
A harvest of thorns or of flowers.

12

Song of Life

by Charles Mackay.

A traveller on a dusty road
Strewed acorns on the lea;
And one took root and sprouted up,
And grew into a tree.
Love sought its shade at evening-time,
To breathe its early vows;
And Age was pleased, in heights of noon,
To bask beneath its boughs.
The dormouse loved its dangling twigs,
The birds sweet music bore—
It stood a glory in its place,
A blessing evermore.

A little spring had lost its way
Amid the grass and fern;
A passing stranger scooped a well
Where weary men might turn.
He walled it in, and hung with care
A ladle on the brink;
He thought not of the deed he did,
But judged that Toil might drink.
He passed again; and lo! the well,
By summer never dried,
Had cooled ten thousand parchéd tongues,
And saved a life beside.

A nameless man, amid the crowd
That thronged the daily mart,
Let fall a word of hope and love,
Unstudied from the heart,
A whisper on the tumult thrown,
A transitory breath,
It raised a brother from the dust,
It saved a soul from death.
O germ! O fount! O word of love!
O thought at random cast!
Ye were but little at the first,
But mighty at the last.

13

Help In Need

by James McIntyre

A poor man's horse it ran away,
Soon man upon the roadside lay,
With his leg all badly broken,
Of sympathy some gave token.

One said your trouble grieves my heart,
But with his money would not part,
Another said, while heaving sighs,
It brings the tears into mine eyes.

But a good true hearted man,
His heart with kindness it o'er ran,
The poorest man among the three,
A pound he did contribute free.

Others gave in empty feeling,
But this poor man he did bring healing,
The giver only Lord doth prize,
Who helps afflicted for to rise.

14

The Heartening

by Winifred Webb

It may be that the words I spoke
To cheer him on his way,
To him were vain, but I myself
Was braver all that day.

15

Small Beginnings

by Charles Mackay

A traveler on the dusty road
Strewed acorns on the lea;
And one took root and sprouted up,
And grew into a tree.
Love sought its shade, at evening time,
To breathe his early vows;
And age was pleased, in heats of noon,
To bask beneath its boughs;
The dormouse loved its dangling twigs,
The birds sweet music bore;
It stood a glory in its place,
A blessing evermore.

A little spring had lost its way
Amid the grass and fern,
A passing stranger scooped a well
Where weary men might turn;
He walled it in, and hung with care
A ladle at the brink;
He thought not of the deed he did,
But judged that all might drink.
He paused again, and lo! the well,
By summer never dried,
Had cooled ten thousand parching tongues
And saved a life beside.

A dreamer dropped a random thought;
'Twas old, and yet 'twas new;
A simple fancy of the brain,
But strong in being true.
It shone upon a genial mind,
And, lo! its light became
A lamp of life, a beacon ray,
A monitory flame;
The thought was small, its issue great;
A watch-fire on the hill;
It shed its radiance far adown,
And cheers the valley still.

A nameless man, amid a crowd
That thronged the daily mart,
Let fall a word of Hope and Love,
Unstudied from the heart;
A whisper on the tumult thrown,
A transitory breath—
It raised a brother from the dust,
It saved a soul from death.
O germ! O fount! O word of love!
O thought at random cast!
Ye were but little at the first,
But mighty at the last.

16

Our Duty

by Richard Lynott O'Malley

O disconsolate man, why fret and complain
That no use was thy birth, that thy life hath been vain?
Bear in mind, every mortal that ever draws breath
Has a duty assigned to fulfill before death;
And thou hast thine own, be it great, be it small,
And perhaps unaware thou art true to it all.

Hast thou e'er helped a bosom to banish distress?
Hast thou e'er helped a heart into happiness?
Hast thou played with the children, and taught them to play?
Hast thou prayed with the children, and taught them to pray?
Hast thou smiled on the good? hast thou frowned upon sin?
Hast thy heart felt the glow of true kindness within?
Ay, thy duty is such; yet it may be well done
By a tear and kind word for the desolate one;
Yea, e'en but one sigh for a mortal in pain
Were enough to convince that thy life is not vain.

17

"I'll Stretch It a Little"

by Anonymous

The wintry blast was fierce and cold,
And the lassie's coat was thin and old.
Her little brother by her side
Shivered and pitifully cried.
"Come underneath my coat," said she,
"And see how snug and warm you'll be."
The brother answered, nothing loth,
"But is it big enough for both?"
"Yes," said the girl, with cheery wit;
"I'll stretch it out a little bit."

Ah, brothers, sisters, where the mind
Is bent upon an action kind,
What though the means are sparely spun,
And hardly seem to serve for one?
Stretch them with love, and straightway you
Will find them amply wide for two!

18

Be Kind

by Margaret Courtney

Be kind to thy father — for when thou wert young,
Who loved thee so fondly as he?
He caught the first accents that fell from thy tongue,
And joined in thine innocent glee.

Be kind to thy father, for now he is old,
His locks intermingled with grey,
His footsteps are feeble, once fearless and bold;
Thy father is passing away.

Be kind to thy mother — for lo! on her brow
May traces of sorrow be seen,
O, well mayest thou cherish and comfort her now,
For loving and kind hath she been.

Remember thy mother — for thee will she pray,
As long as God giveth her breath,
With accents of kindness, then cheer her lone way,
E'en to the dark valley of death.

Be kind to thy brother — his heart will have dearth,
If the smile of thy love be withdrawn;
The flowers of feeling will fade at their birth,
If the dew of affection be gone.

Be kind to thy brother — wherever you are,
The love of a brother shall be
An ornament purer and richer by far,
Than pearls from the depths of the sea.

Be kind to thy sister — not many may know
The depth of true sisterly love;
The wealth of the Ocean lies fathoms below
The surface that sparkles above.

Thy kindness shall bring to thee many sweet hours,
And blessing thy pathway to crown;
Affection shall weave thee a garland of flowers,
More precious than wealth or renown.

There’s nothing so kingly as kindness,
And nothing so royal as truth.

– Alice Cary
Nobility

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